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The Best Way To Unclog Your Ears After A Flight

All of us are familiar with the odd sensation in our ears that occurs during and after a flight. Blocked or “clogged” ears can be a nuisance or even painful but with some preparation plus moderation, nothing that has to ruin your next airplane ride.

Dr. Saba Ghorab has over 14 years of education and specialized surgical training as a board-certified and fellowship-trained in Otolaryngology; Head and Neck Surgery (also known as ENT or ear, nose, and throat). She recently joined an episode of the foXnoMad Podcast and describes how to deal with clogged ears. You can watch a clip here or listen to the full episode below.

Prepare Before You Fly

Having sinuses that are de-congested as much as possible before you fly puts your inner ear in the best condition to deal with pressure changes at altitude. Dr. Ghorab recommends a decongestant spray 15 minutes before your flight, particularly if you’re prone to allergies. Treating any other common sources of congestion or inflammation, like symptoms of a cold, can also help.

Chewing gum and yawning often to physically open the Eustachian tube in your inner ears will help it equalize with the changing pressure as you go up or down in altitude.

Use Moderation

You can (and should) hold your nose and blow to further open your Eustachian tubes but remember not to overdo it. We’ve talked about what can go wrong if you hold your nose and blow as hard as you can so lighter, more frequent attempts are better than one massive attempt. Keep at it, be patient, and don’t force the issue. For most stubborn cases of clogged airplane ears time will usually do its magic eventually, with a little help from you.

Pandemic Email Update 2021

Pandemic Email Update 2021

Hello. It’s been a while since I posted a direct update to all of you reading, so here’s a few things going on. The first is that Google is discontinuing the email service many of you are using to get email updates of my posts. I’m working on an alternative now that should require nothing for you to do but just a heads up, the new emails might have a different look.

Nearing 10,000

About 2 years ago I started posting two videos on YouTube a week that will help you travel smarter. Right now we’re closing in on 10,000 subscribers and you can help the foXnoMad channel hit that milestone by subscribing here! And for those of you who want to take an extra step of supporting, you can get exclusive updates and other perks by becoming a channel member. (This month all the membership revenue will go to One Tree Planted!)

Podcast In Apple’s Top 200

And because of your support, the foXnoMad Podcast has hit Apple’s Top 200, ranking as high as 7th in tech. I’ve been touched by your support and very fortunate to have the guests who’ve been a part of it. Travelers, Ivy League professors, and actors – if you haven’t had a chance to listen, you can find all the episodes wherever you listen to podcasts.

Travel Expansion

Although most of us, myself included, haven’t been able to travel in many months, what foXnoMad is has grown beyond the site to include more of the world you want to see. Expect some updates to the shop soon plus a few other things I won’t spoil just yet. In the meantime though, a big thank you.

Thank you for sticking around during a time unprecedented in modern history: when the world stopped traveling. Your likes, comments, and subscribes all show me your wanderlust and love for tech hasn’t gone anywhere. The next big trip is on the horizon and I appreciate you having me part of your journey, even during a global pandemic.

-Anil

Two Great Portable Tripods For Travel Under $100

A good tripod for travel needs to be light but strong while at the same time being collapsible into a small size. Full-size tripods come in all shapes, sizes, and vary widely by price but two tripods under $100 offer a lot for travelers. The Manfrotto Advanced Compact Aluminum and Neewer Carbon Fiber 66-inch have their strengths for both video and photographers hitting the road.

Photography Choice: Manfrotto

The Manfrotto has a light aluminum body with arms divided into 3 sections that are secured with a latch system. The head is a pan and tilt, good especially at set angles, but not as versatile for primarily video shooters. The Advanced Compact Aluminum is a straightforward tripod that weighs 1.42 kilograms (3.13 pounds) and has a maximum height of 165 centimeters (5.4 feet).

The drawback to the use of aluminum legs is that they can’t support a lot of weight when compared to other materials like carbon fiber. A carrying capacity of 3kg (6.6 lbs) might not be a problem depending on your particular gear and if you’re photo first, the Manfrotto Advanced Compact Aluminum is a good choice to consider.

Video Choice: Neewer Carbon Fiber 66-Inch

Although it’s closer to the $100 price mark than the Manfrotto, the Neewer is a lot less expensive than most carbon fiber tripods on the market. The Neewer is light, weighing 1.54kg (3.4 lbs) but can carry an impressive 12kg (26.5 lbs). A ball head gives more flexibility with shooting angles which are easier to work when filming video, plus the Neewer can be setup completely horizontal. A further tribute to its flexible design is the monopod built into one of the legs.

The Neewer might have a few extra bells and whistles but if you’re looking for something simpler, more photography oriented, and at a slightly lower cost the Manfrotto might be better suited to your needs. Of course if you want to go ultra portable the Joby Gorillapod is a much more compact alternative.

Mavic Mini 2 Review: Your Most Commonly Asked Questions Answered

The Mavic Mini 2 is the smallest drone currently in the DJI lineup. Its portability benefits are tangible but are the tradeoffs worth the light weight? If you’ve been eyeing the Mini 2 against its larger cousins in the Mavic line like the Air 2, these are your most common questions, answered.

What’s special about the Mavic Mini 2?

As you can see in my video review here, the Mavic Mini has the footprint of a smartphone and weighs only 249 grams.

Why 249 grams?

It’s the weight just below the requirement for drone registration in many countries. To stay up to date, his map is updated in real-time and DroneMate (Android/iOS) puts all the local laws and regulations in your pocket for offline use.

How does the Mini 2 handle in windy conditions?

The Mini 2 is rated at a level 5 wind resistance, the same as the larger Mavic Air 2 which means it can handle winds up to 28-39 kilometers per hour.

Does the image remain stable?

Yes, you can see some of that footage in the video review, which hasn’t been stabilized in post-production. Basically meaning the steadiness of the shot is both from the Mini 2’s enhanced motors (over the Mini 1) and camera gimbal.

The Mavic Mini 1 is still on sale, should I get it?

No. The Mavic Mini 2 is better is every way and the money savings are minimal.

How does the footage look?

Mike from Drone Supremacy did a comparison you can watch below between the Mavic Mini 2 and the Air 2. Can you tell the difference?

What can’t the Mini 2 do?

It’s a great drone but not perfect. The Mini 2 is missing front facing obstacle avoidance sensors so you’ve got to be extra careful when flying. Also, without front sensors special flight modes like Active Track aren’t possible since the Mini 2 can’t fly around what it can’t see.

Is this the drone to get?

The Mavic Mini 2 is a powerful little drone but a smaller drone means a smaller camera sensor so it doesn’t do particularly well in lower light situations. If camera quality is a priority for you, go with a larger Mavic like the Air 2. However, if you travel frequently, not having to register this drone is a big benefit and being as small as it is, you’ll probably end up bringing the Mini 2 to more places.

The North Face Recon Holds Up After 3 Years Of Wear Without Tear

It’s been 3 years since I originally reviewed the unassuming The North Face Recon backpack. Those of you who follow my Road Tested! series know though the review doesn’t stop once the camera turns off and the article is posted. The North Face Recon is no different and having used this backpack for the past 36 months, it’s impressed me with its physical durability. The design though, still isn’t for everyone.

You can watch my full review in the video above or read on.

Hold Up Better Than Well

Typically on a backpack the parts that wear most the those that have contact with the wearer. Especially the straps around the shoulders and the lower part of the backpack since both tend to move most when you’re walking. Against all of that friction the Recon’s spongy mesh holds its bounce and hardly shows its age.

Threading remains threaded without any stray fibers dangling around like a dog’s tongue our a car window. Even the nylon exterior is only as dirty as you are lazy to simply wipe it off with your hand. Given that this backpack costs less than $100, from a durability perspective, you certainly get your money’s worth.

No Changes In Design

Physical durability is one aspect of a products longevity but so is the original design when compared to the newer additions to the backpack market. The North Face Recon still holds its own because it has such a study and straightforward design. On the bigger side of 22 liters, the big front bucket pocket is flexible. You can pack in clothes, books, or electronics or any combination of that or whatever else that fits.

The North Face Recon Holds Up After 3 Years Of Wear Without Tear

A large casual open pocket on the front is good for an extra sweater to stuff in but the laptop compartment does eat from some of the usable space inside. The somewhat even design shows what that the Recon is a small backpack made for short day trips but is big enough for minimalist travelers too.

Getting The Best From The Recon

The North Face’s has made a tough turtle shell of a backpack that’s great for school, office, or hiking trips. You can see the Recon was an inadvertent part of the first wave of one bag travel backpacks but that category has passed it by now. Still, if you’re looking for a solid backpack that’s big enough for a weekend trip and solid enough to last years, The North Face Recon is great choice to consider.

Save Money On Timbuk2 Bags With This Checkout Trick

Save Money On Timbuk2 Bags With This Checkout Trick

A well throughout design and impressive durability, Timbuk2 bags earn their premium price tags. You can however save money on most Timbuk2 purchases by using a discount trick that requires a little patience.

How To Save 10-15% On Timbuk2

First, head over to the Timbuk2 website. Shop around for the products you like and you choose the bag for you, add them it your cart. Then, begin the checkout process and be sure to add your email address when it asks. Keep going until you get to the part where you enter in payment details.

Don’t enter your payment details on this page. Rather, close it and wait.

You might get a popup offering you a discount before the site lets you close the webpage but if you wait up to 24 hours, Timbuk2 will send you the offer again – which might be even more – up to 15% off.

Not The Only Site

Timbuk2 isn’t the only seller to send email discounts to hook potential customers. Many will offer you a popup discount if you try to leave at the payment page but if you’re not in a rush, you might get an email discount in a day or two. Otherwise you can try corporate discounts or Honey but with the latter, be sure to check their privacy policy first. REI stores in the U.S. also tend to sell various brand bags at a discount, so be sure to compare with their online shop as well to get the best deal.

About Anil Polat

foxnomad aboutHi, I'm Anil. foXnoMad is where I combine travel and tech to help you travel smarter. I'm on a journey to every country in the world and you're invited to join the adventure! Read More

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