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Category: Money

How Much To Tip For Everything Around The World [MAP]

tipping worldwide

This map is now available in app form! TipFox is available on the App Store and Google Play.

tipfox ios app store     tipfox google play android
Tipping practices around the world can vary from confusing to awkward, especially when you don’t know what the local customs are. To make sure you’re being a courteous traveler who knows how much and what services to tip for your can check the map below. It has all of the tipping practices for restaurants, guides, hairdressers and more.

  • Last update: July 27, 2021

You can also bookmark the map or this page to keep up with any future updates.

Take This Map Offline With You

You can put this map on your phone, for offline use with TipFox (download on iOS or Android) has even more detailed tipping info, notifications with tipping practices based on your location, ways connect with locals and other travelers, plus dedicated support during your travels. You can also bookmark this page so you don’t lose track of the map above.

Share Your Experiences And Updates With Me

This is a living map based on my travels, contact with locals, guides, and feedback from you. Tipping practices can vary a lot based on locality so if you notice anything missing, needing an update, or want to add some information about a service not listed, please comment on this post or email me directly with your update. I’ll keep the map updated to help your fellow travelers and hard working locals as well to make sure nobody leaves feeling shortchanged.

spare change

Putting Spare Change To Use

Of course, after most trips we’re left with change in a foreign currency that often goes out of circulation once we’re back home. Here’s what you can do with leftover foreign currency from an international trip, create a completely digital travel budget, or travel with literally no money at all.

A Review Of The Ridge Wallet, The Slim Way To Carry Only What You Need

The Ridge Wallet is a minimalist way to carry your money without the bulk of a traditional wallet. It’s basically a redesigned wallet made up of two metal plates, elastic, and an optional money clip or cash strap – all of which might sound spartan, cheap, or otherwise useless. Ridge Wallets though they might be the extreme, even for slim wallets, are impressively functional if you’re willing to take the time to adjust.

You can watch my full review in the video above or read on.

Cutting Out The Fat

Trimming down the folds, thick leather, and pockets for stuff you’ll never see again found in traditional wallets, Ridge come in style. There are a number of designs to choose from starting with plates. You can select from aluminum, titanium, and even gold plated wallets with a variety of colors and looks.

Functionally though, these wallets are basically the same. Two pieces of metal-plated plastic, held together by elastic bands measuring a total of 86 x 54 x 6 millimeters and weighing about 71 grams. The Ridge holds up to 12 cards that you pop out by using a cutout in the bottom.

Limited Cash

When it comes to cash, you’ve got two options: a cash strap or money clip. The money clip is reminiscent of more traditional wallets, potentially enticing if you’re not ready to go off the slim deep end entirely. Personally, I prefer the cash strap since it doubles down on the slimness, not to mention it’s easier to slip in and out of your front pocket.

ridge wallet burnt titanium

The other benefit of the cash strap is you can slip in a contact free card there. Since Ridge wallets are RFID blocking, if you still want to tap to pay, you’ll have to place that particular card on the outside. You can do this with the money clip as well but it puts a bit too much pressure, easily scuffing up many credit cards.

Ready To Switch?

Ridge is betting that if you’re going slim, you’re going all the way. There are slim wallets that take a more measured approach like some of Ekster’s offerings or the fabric Trove wallet, but if you want slim with metallic durability, the Ridge wallet is hard to beat, in any color.

The North Face Recon Holds Up After 3 Years Of Wear Without Tear

It’s been 3 years since I originally reviewed the unassuming The North Face Recon backpack. Those of you who follow my Road Tested! series know though the review doesn’t stop once the camera turns off and the article is posted. The North Face Recon is no different and having used this backpack for the past 36 months, it’s impressed me with its physical durability. The design though, still isn’t for everyone.

You can watch my full review in the video above or read on.

Hold Up Better Than Well

Typically on a backpack the parts that wear most the those that have contact with the wearer. Especially the straps around the shoulders and the lower part of the backpack since both tend to move most when you’re walking. Against all of that friction the Recon’s spongy mesh holds its bounce and hardly shows its age.

Threading remains threaded without any stray fibers dangling around like a dog’s tongue our a car window. Even the nylon exterior is only as dirty as you are lazy to simply wipe it off with your hand. Given that this backpack costs less than $100, from a durability perspective, you certainly get your money’s worth.

No Changes In Design

Physical durability is one aspect of a products longevity but so is the original design when compared to the newer additions to the backpack market. The North Face Recon still holds its own because it has such a study and straightforward design. On the bigger side of 22 liters, the big front bucket pocket is flexible. You can pack in clothes, books, or electronics or any combination of that or whatever else that fits.

the north face recon backpack review

A large casual open pocket on the front is good for an extra sweater to stuff in but the laptop compartment does eat from some of the usable space inside. The somewhat even design shows what that the Recon is a small backpack made for short day trips but is big enough for minimalist travelers too.

Getting The Best From The Recon

The North Face’s has made a tough turtle shell of a backpack that’s great for school, office, or hiking trips. You can see the Recon was an inadvertent part of the first wave of one bag travel backpacks but that category has passed it by now. Still, if you’re looking for a solid backpack that’s big enough for a weekend trip and solid enough to last years, The North Face Recon is great choice to consider.

Save Money On Timbuk2 Bags With This Checkout Trick

timbuk2

A well throughout design and impressive durability, Timbuk2 bags earn their premium price tags. You can however save money on most Timbuk2 purchases by using a discount trick that requires a little patience.

How To Save 10-15% On Timbuk2

First, head over to the Timbuk2 website. Shop around for the products you like and you choose the bag for you, add them it your cart. Then, begin the checkout process and be sure to add your email address when it asks. Keep going until you get to the part where you enter in payment details.

Don’t enter your payment details on this page. Rather, close it and wait.

You might get a popup offering you a discount before the site lets you close the webpage but if you wait up to 24 hours, Timbuk2 will send you the offer again – which might be even more – up to 15% off.

Not The Only Site

Timbuk2 isn’t the only seller to send email discounts to hook potential customers. Many will offer you a popup discount if you try to leave at the payment page but if you’re not in a rush, you might get an email discount in a day or two. Otherwise you can try corporate discounts or Honey but with the latter, be sure to check their privacy policy first. REI stores in the U.S. also tend to sell various brand bags at a discount, so be sure to compare with their online shop as well to get the best deal.

How NFTs Could Change Travel

Everydays: The First 5000 Days

The digital photo above sold for $69.3 million dollars. It’s called Everydays: The First 5000 Days by the artist Beeple and although the digital art was auctioned off at Christie’s, you can see I was able to easily copy and paste it above. That does not mean though I’m the owner of the NFT, a concept that may revolutionize how we travel.

What Are NFTs

NFT stands for non-fungible token, in other words something that is unique and can’t be duplicated. NFTs are in a sense akin to rare baseball cards like a 1952 Mickey Mantle that sold for 5.2 million USD. A baseball card is something tangible however, you can hold it in your hands, you buy it and it’s yours. With NFTs the digital file like the image aboven can still be copied like any other file except the NFT, like a public certificate of authenticity, belongs only to one individual.

To get more detailed: the only way to own an NFT is to buy it through a transaction that’s recorded on the blockchain. Blockchain is a way of publicly documented translations. The person who bought Beeple’s artwork above has a public record of that transaction. You can listen to a more thorough explanation of NFTs on the foXnoMad Podcast but your two main takeaways should be: NFTs establish authenticity and chain of ownership.

Wild West Of NFT Trading

Imagine your favorite musician minting songs from their new albums to sell as NFTs. Everyone can still listen to the music but only one person will own the NFT. Think of it as sort of an autograph: you can get the album anywhere but there’s only one Britney Spears signed limited edition.

listening to music

The same concept can be applied to a driver’s license or passport. Fakes are possible but when you check the authenticity of the document against the records of the government who issued them, the frauds become evident. Right now, NFTs are making headlines with high price sales of NBA video clips selling for $240,000 and the grumpy cat meme selling for $83,000.

So why would anyone want to buy one? Well, NFTs have made it possible for specific digital assets to be rare – a rarity people are so far, willing to pay for. The market for NFTs is a rapidly evolving on sure to make even more expensive headlines but aside from the art trade, it has implications for travelers.

True Digital Passports?

Given how digital everything is these days, it does seem a bit odd to carry around a paper book you get stamped when entering a new country. Of course those paper passports are authenticated through centralized computer systems but NFTs could solve that middleman process. Being one of a kind authenticated digital assets that are publicly documented could mean an eventual end to paper passports.

An NFT-based passport and visas would be much, much more difficult to forge and if you lose the device containing your NFT passport, regenerating one through a digital portal is a lot faster than today’s snail mail methods. Of course, how this will all look (an app on your phone?) isn’t clear since it’s the very early days of NFT popularity. The reach into the travel industry for NFTs though is wide from everything to plane and event tickets to yes, maybe your passport too.

5 Ways To Use Frequent Flyer Miles (Other Than Flying)

air force one replica

You might not be flying as much lately – global pandemic or otherwise – but your accumulated frequent flyer miles don’t have to go to waste. Although many airlines have extended frequent flyer programs so your miles won’t expire any time soon, you can put the miles you have now to good use.

Here are 5 ways to use your frequent flyer miles for everything that’s not a flight.

1. Shopping

Most airlines have online malls with a number of retailers including Apple and Best Buy. You’ll find these online malls through the airline mileage website and can use any miles you have for discounts or to purchase items outright. Additionally if you’re using a credit card with mile perks, they most likely will have an online store as well.

sydney australia mall

2. Take A Road Trip

Frequent flyer miles can be used for car rentals or hotels so don’t limit yourself to the sky. As a general rule you’ll get more bang for your mile using points in the travel industry as opposed to a new iPad (see point 1 above).

3. Convert To Cash

You can trade in frequent flyer miles for cash, especially if they’re accumulated through a credit card. NerdWallet breaks down Marriott’s award program (.3 cents per point) but according to Alex Miller, the CEO of Upgraded Points, you want to aim for conversions of a cent per mile.

trove wallet

4. Donate

You’re a good person, I’m sure but just so you know, unless you bought your frequent flyer miles donating them won’t be a tax deduction in most cases. You can though donate your miles, in case you didn’t know that. (Works for random currency you’ve accumulated traveling too.) There are a number of good causes most mileage programs have partnered with and your miles can help others escape political violence or make ends meet (by converting miles to cash).

sunset flight

5. Give To Friends And Family

There’s often a fee to transfer miles to another account (if you’re married though maybe not so contact the airline) but for those people who need to fly, your miles might help them get what they need for a free flight. Like many of the points already mentioned, the best way is through the airline’s online mileage program site, then call to see what better options they might offer you.

While You Wait

Most people haven’t checked up on the miles they have recently or when they might be expiring. If that sounds like you, check your frequent flyer miles right now to make sure they aren’t (or haven’t) vanished. Contact the airlines to see what extension plans are in effect since when travel does resume, you’re likely to get some great deals with the miles you have. So, unless you have a good reason not to, it’s best to stash your miles until you’re ready for sky time since they can protect you from flight cancellations as well.

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About Anil Polat

foxnomad aboutHi, I'm Anil. foXnoMad is where I combine travel and tech to help you travel smarter. I'm on a journey to every country in the world and you're invited to join the adventure! Read More

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