Pictures and Video Archives - foXnoMad

Category: Pictures and Video

How Henry Masks Took Over The NBA

You’ve probably seen a Henry mask, especially if you watch NBA basketball. The recognizable, origami-inspired face covering can be seen on celebrities and athletes. And they look good, standing out among the crowd of Covid reducing coverings you might be so inclined to purchase yourself.

So how did Henry masks get such an endorsement deal? A big, moderately evil corporate entity with money to throw around? Actually it turns out, no. Word of mouth. Developed by Fresh, a designer who was homeless in 2017. These are the kind of stories that will inspire you to do good things and I had the pleasure of speaking with Fresh on a recent episode of the foXnoMad Podcast. It’s well worth listening to, profound, and thought provoking.

You can watch a clip in the video above and listen to the full episode here.

Osprey Daylite Daypack Review: Updated For The Better

Let’s keep this simple. The last Osprey Daylite was a good daypack for hiking or just touristing your way around a city. Big enough for a day’s worth of clothes, light electronic gear, or some combo of the two it didn’t have many noticeable downsides. Now, Osprey have taken that bag and made it better in all the ways that matter with an updated Daylite.

Even Stronger

The Daylite’s materials have been enhanced through cross-stitching and certified recycled recycled polyester. This is a tough bag, even though it’s unassuming at 43 x 26 x 20 centimeters and weighs only 493 grams. You can collapse the Daylite nearly entirely flat or pack it up with 13 liters of stuff.

The shoulder straps have been improved as well. They’re now lighter but with more support – somehow Osprey knew you’d have a tendency to over-pack and compensates for that extra weight. Additionally Osprey removed the lining (coming apart in my older Daylite) for a more durable design.

Easy Choice

Overall, if you’re coming from a previous version of the Daylite but are happy with what you have, this isn’t a must-have upgrade. But if you are thinking your current Daylite (or other daypack) is getting a bit rough around the edges, this is an updated you won’t be disappointed by.

You can watch my full review of the Osprey Daylite in the video above.

How To Handle Photos On Your Phone When It’s Out Of Storage

 

iphone storage

A lot of people’s primary camera is their smartphone. It’s portable, good resolution, and always with you but what happens when a “not enough storage” warning pops up? Well, you can try offloading pictures and video to your laptop but maybe that’s full too. Fortunately there are some options on backing on photos you’ve already taken on your phone so you can have space to take more.

Here’s how to handle photos on your phone when it’s out of storage space.

Clear Up Space Elsewhere

Before going nuclear on your photo albums, start with some basic clean up. Obviously check for any duplicate photos or those taken in sequence (you know the one that turned out good, delete the rest). Sorting through and deleting photos and videos you don’t need is good practice because like clutter in your house, there’s only so many cabinets you can stash crap away in. Eventually, you need to clean the house.

You should also check the rest of your phone for common storage culprits. Here’s how to see what’s taking up space on your phone:

  • Android: Depending on the version you’re using the exact steps will vary but generally going into Settings Storage will show you bloated apps.
  • iOS: On most of the latest versions, go to General > Device Storage

Some storage hungry apps tend to be Whatsapp (all those memes you’ve been texting add up) and Podcasts (particularly on iOS).

Cloud Options

Assuming you’ve cleaned up what you can, if you’re still low on storage space, try looking at cloud options. Both Android and iOS devices have services that let you upload your photos and videos to online storage, freeing up space on your phone. All of you media will still be accessible if you want to download it but will live in the cloud otherwise.

icloud

  • Android: Some options include Google Photos (free up to 15 gigabytes) and Google One ($1.99/month for 100GB).
  • iOS: iCloud is Apple’s service that starts at 99 cents in the U.S. (prices vary internationally) for 50GB of storage up to to terabytes for $9.99 a month.

There are a lot of other cloud options but keep in mind, anything that goes to the cloud is more vulnerable than it is on your physical device. Check the privacy policies and use two factor authentication before using any cloud provider to backup photos.

Physical Drives

For phones that can charge wirelessly, SanDisk’s Ixpand can both automatically backup photos and charge your phone, acting as a backup drive. Older phone users that don’t support wireless charging can check out drives that plug in directly, like the iDiskk Photo Stick for iOS devices or SanDisk Dual Drive for Android.

These direct-to-phone options though require a (free) app download to use them. No problem there but be sure to carefully read the privacy policies and permissions of the app prior to using it. Some do allow manufacturers to access your photos – and to be extra cautious, make sure you turn on airplane mode once you get the app and transfer your photos to the drive without an Internet connection.

You Can’t See The Curve Of The Earth From Your Airplane Seat (Mostly)

We know the Earth is definitely round but the view from your airplane seat at cruising altitude isn’t good proof of it. Using math from the 4th century B.C., the ancient Greeks were able measure the curve of Earth at sea level. Taking those same formulas, it turns out most commercial jets aren’t flying as high respective to the size of the earth as it seems.

You’ve probably seen a curved horizon at 10,000 meters during a flight but as you can see in the video above, it’s not what you think.

How To Check For Hidden Cameras And Microphones In Your Vacation Rental, Hotel, Or Airbnb

Hidden cameras in hotel rooms and Airbnbs are much more common than we’d like to think but common enough that you should do a thorough surveillance sweep before settling in. Most people aren’t bug sweeping security experts though there are a number of lessons you can use from them to find concealed devices that could be recording you.

As you can see in the video above where I went through a rental that had devices hidden in it, knowing what to look for is as important as where.

The Threats

We tend to think of cameras first but hidden microphones can be trickier to detect since they don’t need a line of sight. A simple pen could be a microphone in disguise so don’t easily dismiss many common items. Another favorite for Airbnb owners are USB ports that plug into a wall. Those wall chargers can charge your phone but come with a hidden camera that can be very difficult to notice if you’re not looking for it.

Your own mind is working against you so be familiar with the common threats but don’t assume they’re the only ones. (Stuffed animals, alarm clocks, smoke detectors… there are many possibilities.) To be a good bug sweeper, you have to think creatively.

Visual Inspection

Hidden cameras need a line of sight to get footage. Start with the places someone might want to film, the bedroom, bathroom, and common areas. Look at the angles a lens would need to be placed to film the larger parts of rooms or sensitive areas (near a shower). Walk around, making a careful inspection before you unpack your bags.

airbnb rental

Take a note of shelves, vents, or any cracks in wood panels or otherwise dark hiding places that have a line of sight.

Scan The Network

Once you’ve completed your visual inspection, logon to the rental’s wifi network with your phone. Using Net Analyzer scan to see how many other devices are connecting to the network. Minus you phone and any obvious devices like a smart TV, be wary if there are many more devices than you can account for.

Also note any networks that have a very similar name, for example RentalWifi1 and RentalWifiPrivate. Separate wifi networks could be used to hide surveillance devices from the network you happen to be on and common names could be a clue more than one network is in use.

Now that you’ve narrowed things down visually and wirelessly, the next step is to use a bug sweeper.

Sweep Like A Pro

I’ve written about a consumer grade bug sweeper you can use and how to properly scan with one. Those of you who watched the video above know that these devices do work in real-world situations if used properly and with a careful eye.

Remember to check the policies of the rental you’re staying in and the service you’re using since many allow for common areas to be recorded. (Though they hardly advertise that fact.) Still if you end up finding any surveillance device, get in touch with the company and get as much evidence as you can through photos of your own.

As for your legal options, it’s still a grey area in many districts so be wary of any temporary accommodation, especially before you do a bug sweep.

The Best Way To Unclog Your Ears After A Flight

All of us are familiar with the odd sensation in our ears that occurs during and after a flight. Blocked or “clogged” ears can be a nuisance or even painful but with some preparation plus moderation, nothing that has to ruin your next airplane ride.

Dr. Saba Ghorab has over 14 years of education and specialized surgical training as a board-certified and fellowship-trained in Otolaryngology; Head and Neck Surgery (also known as ENT or ear, nose, and throat). She recently joined an episode of the foXnoMad Podcast and describes how to deal with clogged ears. You can watch a clip here or listen to the full episode below.

Prepare Before You Fly

Having sinuses that are de-congested as much as possible before you fly puts your inner ear in the best condition to deal with pressure changes at altitude. Dr. Ghorab recommends a decongestant spray 15 minutes before your flight, particularly if you’re prone to allergies. Treating any other common sources of congestion or inflammation, like symptoms of a cold, can also help.

Chewing gum and yawning often to physically open the Eustachian tube in your inner ears will help it equalize with the changing pressure as you go up or down in altitude.

Use Moderation

You can (and should) hold your nose and blow to further open your Eustachian tubes but remember not to overdo it. We’ve talked about what can go wrong if you hold your nose and blow as hard as you can so lighter, more frequent attempts are better than one massive attempt. Keep at it, be patient, and don’t force the issue. For most stubborn cases of clogged airplane ears time will usually do its magic eventually, with a little help from you.

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About Anil Polat

foxnomad aboutHi, I'm Anil. foXnoMad is where I combine travel and tech to help you travel smarter. I'm on a journey to every country in the world and you're invited to join the adventure! Read More

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