Health and Fitness Archives - foXnoMad

Category: Health and Fitness

How Henry Masks Took Over The NBA

You’ve probably seen a Henry mask, especially if you watch NBA basketball. The recognizable, origami-inspired face covering can be seen on celebrities and athletes. And they look good, standing out among the crowd of Covid reducing coverings you might be so inclined to purchase yourself.

So how did Henry masks get such an endorsement deal? A big, moderately evil corporate entity with money to throw around? Actually it turns out, no. Word of mouth. Developed by Fresh, a designer who was homeless in 2017. These are the kind of stories that will inspire you to do good things and I had the pleasure of speaking with Fresh on a recent episode of the foXnoMad Podcast. It’s well worth listening to, profound, and thought provoking.

You can watch a clip in the video above and listen to the full episode here.

Tropicfeel Makes Travel Shoes You Can Wear Anywhere

This post is sponsored by Tropicfeel. [What is this?]

tropicfeel

When you’re packing for a trip, trying to figure out the right shoes to bring can be confounding. There’s your walking shoes, hiking shoes, and causal sneakers but what Tropicfeel have designed are one shoe to fit them all. Based out of Spain, Tropicfeel claim to be the most funded shoe on Kickstarter and that’s only the beginning of what make them unique.

All-Terrain Sneakers

Tropicfeel make three varieties of their shoe. Monsoon are made to be ultra-light and quick drying, since these shoes are designed to be work in water. The Sunset line are more casual but also made for long walks and handle water without any problems. Tropicfeel sent me the Canyon, which are a combination of the Monsoon and Sunset but with thicker soles made for hiking.

tropicfeel shoes

Having worn the Canyon for several weeks, they stand out in several ways.

What Makes Tropicfeel Different

Right out of the box the vibrant colors of the Night Blue I received stand out but there are four other color options you can choose from. The Canyon are light, weighing just 198 grams, with thick soles made from 80% recycled polyester. The top part of the shoes are a thinner, breathable mesh that can be worn underwater and will dry within minutes on a hot day.

tropicfeel canyon

The insoles are firm but soft and can be removed for hand washing and the rest of the Canyon can be machine washed, then air dried, as needed.

Streamlined Functionality And Comfort

There’s an efficiency to the way Tropicfeel have designed their shoes. First, the Canyon are comfortable to wear on hikes, long walks, or quick jaunts to the grocery store. There are no laces to be tied. Instead, the elastic bands make slipping the Canyon on and off fast; leaving you to wonder why so many other shoes mess with string laces at all.

To get the right fit though, you’ll need to account for socks. See, Tropicfeel’s shoes are meant to be worn barefoot but they can definitely be comfortably worn with socks. You’ll need to order a size up in European (e.g. 40 to 41) or half a U.S. size if you plan to generally have socks on. Once you’ve found the right fit, both barefoot or with socks, the Tropicfeel Canyon are comfortable, especially after they’ve been broken in over a few days.

tropicfeel canyon

For those of you wondering, to further prevent odors (whether you’re wearing these barefoot or not) the Canyon are lined with Agion, a silver antimicrobial to prevent odor. Tropicfeel says this Agion treatment should last the entire lifetime of any of their shoes.

Minimalist Footwear

In many areas of the design Tropicfeel have made the Canyon an impressively efficient shoe for daily use. Yes, these are shoes made for travel but versatile and stylish enough to be worn even when you’re not on the road. All of the clever features Tropicfeel have built into their shoes – like being machine washable – are useful no matter where you are.

Sure there are elements of the Canyon that show off its portable side, from the thin mesh than can be collapsed down for packing – but Tropicfeel haven’t made a shoe that’s a collection of travel gimmicks. Rather, the Canyon are a hybrid of several types of shoes you probably already own but this time with some clever enhancements.

The Best Way To Unclog Your Ears After A Flight

All of us are familiar with the odd sensation in our ears that occurs during and after a flight. Blocked or “clogged” ears can be a nuisance or even painful but with some preparation plus moderation, nothing that has to ruin your next airplane ride.

Dr. Saba Ghorab has over 14 years of education and specialized surgical training as a board-certified and fellowship-trained in Otolaryngology; Head and Neck Surgery (also known as ENT or ear, nose, and throat). She recently joined an episode of the foXnoMad Podcast and describes how to deal with clogged ears. You can watch a clip here or listen to the full episode below.

Prepare Before You Fly

Having sinuses that are de-congested as much as possible before you fly puts your inner ear in the best condition to deal with pressure changes at altitude. Dr. Ghorab recommends a decongestant spray 15 minutes before your flight, particularly if you’re prone to allergies. Treating any other common sources of congestion or inflammation, like symptoms of a cold, can also help.

Chewing gum and yawning often to physically open the Eustachian tube in your inner ears will help it equalize with the changing pressure as you go up or down in altitude.

Use Moderation

You can (and should) hold your nose and blow to further open your Eustachian tubes but remember not to overdo it. We’ve talked about what can go wrong if you hold your nose and blow as hard as you can so lighter, more frequent attempts are better than one massive attempt. Keep at it, be patient, and don’t force the issue. For most stubborn cases of clogged airplane ears time will usually do its magic eventually, with a little help from you.

Have Travel Influencers Let Us Down During The Pandemic?

tulum mexico

There have been two big groups of travel creators during the Covid-19 pandemic: those who talk about how they can’t travel and those who have kept on traveling. The problem are the content creators who sit right in the middle of what’s said and what they’ve done. Mask-less YouTubers, Instagram models, and bloggers have carved out a niche of continuing to move while ignoring the main travel story of the past 12 months.

In case you need to be reminded: coronavirus.

I Can’t Travel…

Plenty of travel creators have been in Mexico, Portugal, Albania, or Turkey (countries that were generally open during the pandemic) lamenting online that they can’t travel. As far as I know, if you’re visiting a country you don’t live in for the purpose of I feel like it, that’s traveling. The fact that you might not be able to eat indoors at a restaurant or go out on weekends doesn’t mean you’re not currently traveling.

fruit breakfast

Photos on Instagram tell another story of cafe life, aerial yoga classes, and lots of group selfies in some place that also happens to have a high number of Covid related hospitalizations and deaths. It should all be called out for what it is: disregard for the people and places who’ve taken the pandemic seriously.

A Shame

Very few creators want to talk about travel shaming and pointing fingers so let’s not call out any specific people. The travel industry and online community is especially vanilla, avoiding any strong opinions so as to appeal to the masses (and the potential money they might bring).

And the pandemic has become a political issue.

Consequently travel influencers are generally (or at least publicly) liberal leaning. On the topic of the pandemic though, for many, their movement to places where they can get away from the rules tells another story. Not that they’re conservative but that Covid is getting in the way, so let’s go around it.

Unfortunately science doesn’t work that way.

Not That Big A Deal

Away from the public however a lot of travel creators will tell you that coronavirus isn’t that big of a deal. Many will also not tell you they’ve had coronavirus and picked it up most likely at a large social gathering. Just check their Instagram. How many other people, including locals, they’ve infected? You won’t see that on TikTok.

None of this is to say any of us are perfect or that this is every travel blogger-vlogger-creator out there. Only that not many are talking about the disconnect between the posts and the reality. To me, that’s the real travel story of the past 12 months. Being upfront about it is a bit less glamorous but a lot more useful to the people following. So live as you want, just tell it like it is.

Trust me, it’ll be authentic.

Not Wanting To Exercise Is Normal, Here’s Why

There are a lot of myths about fitness, including the notion that our ancestors were hulking super-humans who were always on the go. It turns out according to Harvard professor of human evolutionary biology Daniel Lieberman, hunter gatherers do a lot more sitting than you think.

Dr. Lieberman is the author of Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do Is Healthy and Rewarding and recently joined me on a recent episode of the foXnoMad Podcast to discuss common myths above movement. We also talk about the Paleo diet and why eating from a Stone Age menu might not be ideal.

You can watch a clip of my interview with Dr. Lieberman in this video or listen to the full foXnoMad Podcast episode here.

Turkish Vegan Recipe: How To Cook Mercimek Koftesi (Lentil Balls)

There are a lot of traditional Turkish dishes that are vegetarian or vegan in their original form. A popular local dish I‘ve mentioned before is mercimek (mer-ji-mek) koftesi (kouf-te-si), which are spicy lentil balls with onions and a few other ingredients. Last time I had my mom join a live chat here on the site to show you tips on preparing lentil balls.

For this recipe, I figured it even better to make a video with my mom showing you how to make mercimek koftesi so you can cook them for yourself, friends, or family any time you like. You can see the entire process in the video here.

Ingredients You’ll Need

Adjust as needed, just make sure to keep the ratios in proportion.

  • 4 cups red lentils
  • 2 cups thin bulgur rice
  • 8 cups water
  • 3 onions
  • 3 bundles spring onions
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons mint
  • 2 tablespoons crushed red pepper
  • 2 tablespoons red pepper paste (spicy)

Total Cooking Time

With preparation, about 3 hours.

Any Questions?

Overall these lentil balls are a good side dish you can make to go along with any meal. They’re completely vegan in their original recipe so if you’re traveling in Turkey, it’s a good best if you come across mercimek koftesi there will be no animal products in it.

Let us know if you have any questions in the comments below and if you’d like to see more recipes on YouTube!

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About Anil Polat

foxnomad aboutHi, I'm Anil. foXnoMad is where I combine travel and tech to help you travel smarter. I'm on a journey to every country in the world and you're invited to join the adventure! Read More

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